AuthorCarole Brooks

Winnetka Congregational Church

While not quite as large as the Oak Cliff Christian Church, the stone construction on Windomere north is a special construction worth saving. At least it is doubtful the DISD will be able to get the land (sealing its hopelessness in my view) because the newly updated Greiner Middle School is located across the road.

The Winnetka Congregational Church was established about 1914. In 1915 they had a Sunday School attendance of approximately 60 and initially held their services at a one-story frame construction down the road from the current church. They termed themselves “An Independent Bible Church” and have been allied with the Dallas Theological Seminary (founded from the above mentioned Lewis Sperry Chafer) along with the Dallas Bible Institute, and 8 of 10 Sundays you can discover an itinerant minister presenting the sermon. A few of the preachers throughout the years comprised J.W. Logan (possibly the 1st), Allen Crabtree from the early 1920s, Ray Fortna at 1929, T. Warwick Brandon at 1933, W.W. Orr at 1937, along with Floyd W. Shiery, that resigned in 1943 to become a military chaplain.

church

The ground was divided for the present 4600 square foot church in October 1929. It was created by architect T. J. Galbraith and constructed by local builders Eckert-Burton at a price of $33,000. The 46×100 foot construction would comprise of 14 rooms, a central auditorium, and a also basement.

The last bit of information that I could locate about the Winntka Congregational Church was October 1955, under Pastor Estil Schale. For at least the past ten years that the church was called El Buen Samaritano Methodist Church.

The Texas Theatre

Founded on San Jacinto Day, April 21, 1931, as the biggest movie theatre in Dallas. Just the Majestic and the Palace Theaters in downtown Dallas surpassed the Texas’ potential of 2000 customers. It had been known as the primary theatre in Dallas to be assembled especially for motion pictures with sound, and it also featured a pipe organ instrument which was played regularly. The first week’s schedule included the Fox Movietone News, a Buster Keaton show and a Mickey Mouse animation. Cost of entry was 35, 25, or 10 cents depending on which show you wanted to see.

When the theatre opened, it was quite a sight. With original hint and marquis. The glowing lights and Italian Renaissance front led some to tag West Jefferson as a great “Amusement Way.”

Below, the way the theater looks today.

texas theatre